The Fallacy of Rest

Hello!

A while back I made a bad scheduling mistake. I knew about the anti-pattern that caused it, but didn’t see myself using it. It forced me to push out dates that cost me some money.

Later I looked back to see what went wrong. It was exactly what I have advised others not to do. It’s easy to miss! I’m writing this article to re-expose the anti-pattern I used.

The project was Move to a New City. I would be taking my job with me. This is the schedule I wrote:

  • Week 1
    • Pack
    • Work
  • Week 2
    • Weekdays
      • Pack
      • Work
      • Clean
    • Weekend
      • Clean
      • Say goodbye to friends
  • Week 3
    • Monday (Vacation Day)
      • Exercise and rest
      • Say goodbye to friends
    • Tuesday (Vacation Day)
      • Return keys
      • Drive to new city (5 hours on the road)
      • Check in to AirBnB
      • Hang out with friend who lives in new city
    • Wednesday through Friday
      • Work
      • Look at new housing

Seems fine! I even budgeted time to exercise.

Tuesday of week 3. 100% on schedule. It’s bedtime and I’m watching an episode of The Dick Van Dyke Show on my laptop and laughing myself to sleep with Mary Tyler Moore’s performance. I feel awesome. I sleep like I’ve just run a marathon.

Wednesday. Mild headache (whatever – I’m an engineer, we get headaches). I catch up on work, message about a couple rentals, and attend the morning meetings. As the meetings are wrapping up I get a reply on a rental with a proposed time to view it. I can just barely make it, so I head out.

See the mistake yet? I still hadn’t. Wednesday was a busy day and I felt rushed, but I’ve had lots of busy days. I just kept going. I didn’t make the mistake on Wednesday.

That afternoon I got one more email about a rental. It was a wafer-thin mint (see Monty Python’s The Meaning of Life ⬅️ this is how I am making the post about Python). Suddenly getting through the rest of my inbox felt like climbing a mountain. I was burnt out.

The mistake happened when I first wrote the schedule. Here’s the fallacy I used:

People are like horses. Rest them two hours a day and one full day every week or so and they’re fine. Feed and water three times a day.

People are not like horses. They can’t sustain themselves on periodic rest intervals.

Here’s how people work:

Productive workers have a budget of hours per week. When those hours are spent they spend themselves to keep going. Once too much of themselves is gone, they stop producing.

I wrote a schedule in the mindset of making sure I had rest intervals, but I should have figured out the hours needed and divided that by my sustainable weekly hours (a number I’ve learned during two decades of working). That would be the total weeks really needed to complete the move.

Going back over the hours I spent I found I had scheduled 200% of my sustainable capacity and had expected to sustain that for most of a month. (╯°□°)╯︵ ┻━┻

Another way to look at my mistake is that I didn’t count saying goodbye to friends as work (just like I sometimes forget to count attending meetings as work). In the context of human capacity, leaving behind your friends is absolutely work (just like sitting in a frustrating meeting is). It drains your budget of hours. If you do too much of it, you exhaust.

To write a schedule that workers can reliably complete, budget based on what workers can do per week and make sure you get that amount from their real history of work. Don’t make it up, look back at the past and compute it.

I’m going to bed. Happy scheduling!

Adam

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